Bike Clicking When Pedaling: Where the Sound Comes From and How to Eliminate It?

This article will help you find the reason behind clicking sounds coming from your bike and deal with them efficiently!
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Last updatedLast updated: June 29, 2022
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Biking is a healthy way to get your routine exercise or get yourself where you need to go. Sometimes when we are riding our bike, we will notice the sound of our bike clicking while pedaling. This can cause concern for many bike owners because this may mean that your bike needs maintenance. Bike clicking while peddling can also be the result of how you are peddling, which isn’t always a bad thing. You should still examine your bike to make sure there isn’t any damage or maintenance that needs to be done. Routine checkups for your bike can help make sure that you make the most of your bike’s lifespan. Read through this article to make sure that your bike is getting the proper care it needs, and to ensued you can keep your bike for as long as you can. We will walk you through why your bike may be making clicking noises and how to resolve any potential issues with your bike.

Why does your bike make a clicking noise when pedaling?

There are many reasons why your bike might be making a clicking noise when peddling. These reasons include how hard you peddle your bike, issues with your derailleur pulleys, problems with your Presta valve nuts, issues with your cassette cogs, issues with your pedals and bottom bracket, or unsteady brake pads. All these things can cause bike clicking noises while peddling, and we will walk you through how to resolve all these issues.

Hard pedaling

One of the most common reasons that clicking noises occur when peddling Trusted Source Biking your way to better health: How to reboot your workout routine | CNN In Part V of this seven-part series on how to reboot your workout routine, fitness expert Dana Santas shares how to get set up for a cycling routine – one that you’ll stick with for great cardiovascular health. www.cnn.com your bike is because there is not enough lube on your chain to accommodate how hard you are peddling. Lubing up your bike chain regularly is an important factor in keeping your bike running smooth. If you are regularly using your bike to perform strenuous exercises like mountain biking, you may need to lube your bike chain more often.

Derailleur pulleys issue

Another common cause of your bike making a clicking noise when pedaling is issued with your derailleur pulleys Trusted Source Why this city is Europe's best kept cycling secret Portugal is the largest manufacturer of bikes in the European Union, a fact many people outside of the country might not know. Last year, more than 2.6 million bikes were made in Portugal, according to official EU figures. www.bbc.com . When your bike derailer pulleys start to go out, you should have them replaced to avoid larger, more expensive bike issues. You can also try to lube the pulleys to see if that will resolve the issue before you replace the derailleur pulleys. If, after you lube the pulleys, you still notice a clicking noise while pedaling, then you should go ahead and replace your derailleur pulleys.

Presta valve nuts problem

Another issue that can cause your bike to make clicking noises while biking is having problems with your Presta valve nuts. If the nuts appear to be rusty, then you should replace them to get the most longevity out of your bike and avoid other bike parts becoming rusty. If you do not notice any rust on your Presta valve nuts, then you can just tighten them and see if that fixes the issue. Clicking noises can result from your Presta valve nuts loosening over time.

Cassette cogs need inspecting

Bike Clicking When Pedaling: Where the Sound Comes From and How to Eliminate It?

Inspect your cassette cogs to make sure that they are on your bike tightly. Tightening your cassette cogs may get rid of the clicking noise when you peddle your bike.

Problems with your cassette cogs can cause your bike to make clicking noises while peddling too. It is common for many parts of the bike to become loose with regular use of your bike. Loose cassette cogs can cause difficulty shifting gears on your bike as well.

Pedals and bottom bracket need attention

The peddles and bottom bracket of your bike are important parts that can cause your bike to make clicking noises while peddling. Inspect your bike peddles and your bottom bracket to make sure that the parts are on tightly. Any loose parts can cause your bike to make creaking noises while peddling. You may need to replace these parts if the following doesn’t resolve the issue.

Tighten all the parts, and if you still notice a clicking noise while peddling, consider replacing your pedals and bottom bracket.
To find out if replacement is necessary for your bottom bracket, you need to remove the chain from the smallest chainring and spin your peddles. Stickiness, grittiness, or a wobbly bottom bracket can indicate it is time to replace the bottom bracket. If these issues are not present, keep trying other troubleshooting options on this list.

Unsteady brake pads

Having unsteady brake pads on your bike can also cause your bike to make a clicking noise while you peddle. Check to make sure that your brake pads are correctly positioned and make sure that your rims are clean. Dirt and grit on the rims can cause a clicking noise when the dirt brushes against the brake pads on your bike. Check the condition of your brake pads too. Worn-out or damaged brake pads can cause a persistent clicking noise while you are riding your bike. When your brake pads are worn out, it is time to replace them.

How to fix other bike noises?

Bike Clicking When Pedaling: Where the Sound Comes From and How to Eliminate It?

Other troublesome noises you may encounter when you ride your bike are squeaking, squealing, and creaking. All the noises can indicate parts that need replacement or parts that are on correctly attached to the bike.

Listening to concerning noises while riding your bike is the best way to ensure optimum performance. Read the list below to solve your other bike noise issues.

Squeaky bike brakes

Bike brakes are one of the most important parts on your bike to replace when they start to go out. Squeaky brakes can be an indicator of a few different things, though, and don’t always require a replacement.

The first thing you should check when trying to find out why your brakes are squeaking is to make sure your brake pads are correctly positioned on your bike.

Another thing to do before you consider replacing the brakes on your bike is to clean your bike parts. Dirt and debris can cause unpleasant noises when you ride your bike, and it isn’t uncommon for bikes to get dirt logged in odd spots.

Rear suspension pivot noises

Another cause of concerning noises when riding your bike might be your rear suspension. When a rear suspension has multiple pivot points, it can be common for unpleasant noises to occur. Rear suspensions with multiple pivot points should be tightened to make sure they are securely attached to the bike. When a rear suspension isn’t tightened in the first place, it is common for the part to become loose as your ride your bike. Make sure all parts are tightened, and then apply lube to the parts after tightening to reduce squeaking while you ride.

Creaky seat post

If you sit down on your bike and immediately notice a creaking noise, you need to check your seat post. All parts of the bike need to be properly lubed, including the seat post. Your seat post will not severely affect your riding experience like other parts of your bike would but listening to creaking noises every time your weight shifts on the seat can be very annoying.

All you need to do to resolve a creaky seat post is to remove the seat post from the bike and thoroughly lube it up. Lubing up the seat post will resolve the creaking sounds immediately.

Squeaky bike crank

Annoying squeaking noises can also come from your bike crank. Loose parts also play a big part in causing squeaking sounds when it comes to your bike crank. Put pressure on each side of your bike crank to see if you notice any wobbling. Moving the crank around can help you identify the loose bolts and tighten them. Once all parts are tightened onto the bike, the creaking should stop.

Final thoughts

There are many components of a bike that cause creaky sounds while you ride Trusted Source NYC DOT - Bike Smart Use marked bike lanes or paths when available, except when making turns or when it is unsafe to do so. If the road is too narrow for a bicycle and a car to travel safely side by side, you have the right to ride in the middle of the travel lane. Bicycling is permitted on all main and local streets throughout the City, even when no designated route exists. www1.nyc.gov . Most of the time, the reason you hear unpleasant sounds while you ride your bike is that you have some loose parts that need to be tightened. Other common issues are dry or dirty bike parts. Before you consider buying a new bike, you should examine your bike parts to see if any parts are starting to become worn out or aren’t connected to the bike completely. You may also need to replace parts on your bike as time passes by. It is common to need to replace your brake pads and your bike pedals because those parts see the most wear and tear. Hearing your bike creaking while peddling can be very annoying, but it can indicate issues with your bike parts that you should pay attention to.

References

1.
Biking your way to better health: How to reboot your workout routine | CNN
In Part V of this seven-part series on how to reboot your workout routine, fitness expert Dana Santas shares how to get set up for a cycling routine – one that you’ll stick with for great cardiovascular health.
2.
Why this city is Europe's best kept cycling secret
Portugal is the largest manufacturer of bikes in the European Union, a fact many people outside of the country might not know. Last year, more than 2.6 million bikes were made in Portugal, according to official EU figures.
3.
NYC DOT - Bike Smart
Use marked bike lanes or paths when available, except when making turns or when it is unsafe to do so. If the road is too narrow for a bicycle and a car to travel safely side by side, you have the right to ride in the middle of the travel lane. Bicycling is permitted on all main and local streets throughout the City, even when no designated route exists.
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